Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council

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Home Lawyers answer FAQs Open meetings law Can a governmental body vote in closed session? If so, how can I get access to those votes?

Can a governmental body vote in closed session? If so, how can I get access to those votes?

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Q: Can a governmental body vote in closed session? If so, how can I get access to those votes?

A: Yes, a governmental body can vote in closed session under certain circumstances. "A governmental body can vote to take action on matters discussed at a closed session if such action is an integral part of the reason for which the permitted closed session was convened." 66 Wis. Op. Att'y Gen. 93, 97 (1977) (OAG 26-77); see State ex. rel. Cities Service Oil Co. v. Board of Appeals, 21 Wis. 2d 516, 124 N.W.2d 809 (1963); 67 Wis. Op. Att'y Gen. 117 (1978) (OAG 24-78). See section 19.85(1) for a list of the "exemptions" allowing the governmental body to close sessions and see previous question regarding access to those votes.

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